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Old 05-06-2016, 08:33 PM   #86
Miror
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So due to recent goings on, we've decided to bring our announcement of ref's discretion back to the forefront, just to ensure that all understand the nuances of it:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerichi
I have a two-for-one annoucement today!

Lately I've noticed that there's been some issues with how battlers discuss rounds with their refs. While I definitely don't want to discourage communication between refs and battlers (ASB's format is inherently foggy and clarification or explanation of rounds is often needed), there's been a lot of hostility and perhaps even mistrust between refs and battlers. Frankly, this behavior is not acceptable so in hopes of curbing that, we're gonna give you a two resources that would help facilitate more civil discussions.

Firstly, under the spoiler, a small description of ref's discretion:
Spoiler: show
Ref's Discretion. Two words thrown around in ASB that have never been properly defined. Since ref's discretion and its use is still poorly understood, we're gonna make an attempt today to clear up some of the confusion.

Ref's discretion is the basic idea that a ref is the one who ultimately decides the outcome of the way a round plays out. This basically means that anything not dictated by a clear rule is essentially up to the ref. Ref's discretion covers a wide range of situations, including but definitely not limited to:
  • If an attack hits, and how much damage it does/energy it uses.
  • The speed of attacks
  • How attacks interact
  • Initiative
  • Positioning
  • Exhaustion
  • How statuses/move effects manifest
  • Enthusiasm
  • SC effects
  • etc.

That said, ref's discretion is not a carte blanche to do whatever the ref wants and ignore rules or descriptions. A ref should definitely follow the guidelines that the written rules and descriptions outline (e.g. percentage boost/drops, stat mechanics, breather rounds, etc.) and try to stick to what the descripts and rules outline. What it is, though, is creative license to interpret a round how they see fit and alter the letter of the descriptions or rules (within reason) to fit the spirit of the move or the situation that the round might dictate. For instance, even though the rule dictates that a one-mover should be taken roughly once in 3 rounds, if a Pokémon has been using a number of low-power attacks or had a few fail, the ref might decide to let them fight at full without a break. If the description says Slash uses claws, they might have a Pokémon with small claws or a more Slashing-appropriate appendage use something else.

Reffing in the ASB is much more of an art than it is a science. It requires juggling a large number of elements and factors that may influence things differently, especially with refs who might have a different perspective on the situation than the battlers. Things will often not go how you expect, and refs should not ref based on a rigid expectation or based on the battler's desired outcome.

The important thing that ref's discretion plays into, though, is individual round orders. When it comes down to it, a ref's interpretation of a round is going to be how the round should play out. Ultimately, refs have the power to dictate how they think the round should play out, even if you don't picture it that way. As long as they can explain their reasoning for why the round played out why it did and they did not obviously violate any rules in their reffing, the round will stand.


Secondly, I'd like to establish some guidelines for questioning a reffing/modify the existing procedure we already have for questions.

If you have an issue with an element of the round, do the following:
1) Ask a question about the thing you take issue with. Do NOT state how you think it should go (that is a good way of making sure it does NOT go that way).
2) The ref will explain their reasoning. If it is logically consistent, ref's discretion will hold and the round will continue.
3) If you find a clear rule issue or failure to interpret a description, reply as such.
4) If there is still an issue, take it to the Q&A thread to resolve it. If not resolved there, ask in S&I OR PM an LO for assistance.

A quick list of DOs and DON'TS
DO: Ask questions on reffings you're unsure of.
DO: Ask for clarification on points.
DO: Ask in appropriate threads if you're unsure.
DON'T: Give your version of the round
DON'T: Push or be rude to your refs.
DON'T: Delay the battle unnecessarily.

Thanks for your attention and happy battling!
In addition to this, something else we'd like to clarify is in regards to questions posed to a referee. Mind you, feel free to ask questions for clarification on a round, but please refrain from making the question a statement or declaration of "this is how the round should've gone." But the main focus currently needs to be on this: when one of the participants in a battle asks a questions, unless it's something mentioned blatantly in the reffing, their opponent needs to refrain from answering or responding before the referee does. This behavior is becoming alarmingly more common and even present among those held to a higher standard in the community, and not only is this behavior unsporting but it can start unnecessary arguments over how the referee rationalized something before the ref even has an opportunity to explain themselves. So please, if your opponent asks a question, allow the referee to answer first. Still feel free to ask counter-questions if needed, but a battler should really not be answering in the place of the referee.
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